Egyptian blogger Monem threatened again


Silencing Monem?
(Free Monem Campaign, By Malek)

Egyptian blogger and journalist Abdel Monem Mahmoud, who has been released in June 2007 after 46 days imprisonment in Southern Cairo Torah prison, is “facing detention threats [again]. Both as part of the State’s clensing of political activists from the Egyptian scene and also for reporting on torture,” Nora Younis wrote.

In a blog post published today, Monem wrote that the officer Atef el-Hosseiny – who tortured him for 13 days in Nasr City state security headquarters in 2003 – together with Ahmed Moussa, an al-Ahram journalist close to the security services, are orchestrating a campaign against him and coordinating for re-arresting him.

According to Monem, al-Ahram journalist has published information obtained from police reports, apparently filed by el- Hosseiny. The journalist is accusing Blogger Monem to be the Muslim Brotherhood’s delegate to infiltrate the independent al-Dostour newspaper. Monem is also being accused of publishing false information and using digital video cameras and cell phone cameras in his campaign against torture.

Tow weeks ago, on August 16, 2007, Monem has published a very choking video of Mohamed Mamdouh, a 12-year-old child who died as a result from being tortured at Al Mansoura’s Police Station where he was held for stealing two packets of tea from a local shop.

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