Russia Investigates VKontakte User for Posting Ukraine-Related Content

Images mixed by Tetyana Lokot.

Images mixed by Tetyana Lokot.

Russian authorities are investigating a Yekaterinburg woman on charges of “inciting hatred and violence” for posting links to content about Ukrainian Euromaidan protests on the social network VKontakte.

Yekaterina Vologzheninova, a resident of Yekaterinburg, got a visit from law enforcement officials from the Russian Investigative committee a few days before the start of the new year. After searching her apartment and confiscating her laptop, a tablet, a digital camera, and several CDs, the officials took her in for questioning, where she was accused of “inciting hatred and violence” by means of her online posts, with officials citing article 282 of the Russian criminal code.

Vologzheninova says the Investigative committee was interested in her VKontakte posts that contained links to documentaries and TV shows about the events in Ukraine, including the Euromaidan protests and their aftermath. She told the Open Russia website that the investigators were surprised to find she was not a Ukrainian citizen and didn't even have any “Ukrainian roots.” She sometimes posts in Ukrainian, but said she had learned the language herself, out of curiosity.

На допросе в СК меня спросили, не состою ли я в украинских экстремистских организациях, поскольку я подписана на новостные ленты сообществ Русский Правый сектор и УНСО. Такой же вопрос задавали и моему другу, которого допрашивали как свидетеля.
Мне вменяют в вину распространение в социальных сетях ссылок на документальные фильмы и передачи об украинских событиях (в том числе «Зима, которая нас изменила», программа «Храбрые сердца»). Но эти фильмы не содержат информации, разжигающей национальную вражду и призывов к экстремизму.

At the questioning at the Investigative committee I was asked whether I was a member of Ukrainian extremist organizations, since I am subscribed to the news feeds of the Russian Right Sector and UNSO communities [on VKontakte]. They asked the same of my friend, who was questioned as a witness.
I am accused of sharing on social networks the links to documentaries and talk shows about the Ukrainian events (like “The Winter That Changed Us” and the “Brave Hearts” TV show.) But these videos don't contain any information that would incite national hatred or calls to extremism.

Vologzheninova told RFE/RL that she also shared several video clips about the yacht belonging to Vladimir Putin and about the Euromaidan protests in Ukraine on VKontakte.

Investigators have ordered her not to leave the city pending further investigation, and on January 3 she got a call from the Investigative committee asking her to come and sign a “non-disclosure agreement,” which she refused to do without the presence of her lawyer. If officially charged, taken to trial, and convicted, Vologzheninova could face up to four years in jail for her social media activity.

Я не знаю, почему СК заинтересовала моя персона. Я не являюсь политиком или общественным деятелем. Я раньше никогда не имела конфликтов с представителями власти. […] Мне просто интересна точка зрения, альтернативная той, что показывают российские федеральные каналы, и видимо это мне сейчас и пытаются вменить в вину.

I don't know why the Investigative committee is interested in my person. I am not a politician or public figure. I've never had conflicts with authorities before. […] I'm simply interested in a point of view alternative to that which the Russian federal channels are showing, and evidently that is what I am being accused of.

Previously, VKontakte founder Pavel Durov has said he refused to share information on Ukrainian opposition Euromaidan groups organizing on VKontakte with Russian secret police in December of 2013. Durov himself notably made a Euromaidan-related video go viral in February of 2014. But Durov had to leave the company at the start of 2014, and VKontakte has blocked Ukraine-affiliated communities since, including some right-wing nationalist groups in March of 2014.

1 comment

  • […] users’ free expression rights. While some of the most egregious examples are found in China, Russia, and the other usual authoritarian suspects, the problem exists to varying degrees across the gamut […]

Join the conversation

Authors, please log in »

Guidelines

  • All comments are reviewed by a moderator. Do not submit your comment more than once or it may be identified as spam.
  • Please treat others with respect. Comments containing hate speech, obscenity, and personal attacks will not be approved.


Support our work defending online freedom of expression around the world.

justice+matters

Learn why our work is important »

Donate now

Close