January, 2018

Stories from January, 2018

Veto Viber? Tax Telegram? Such Are Tajikistan's Tech Company Conundrums

Once asked why the government was raising a tax on mobile phone companies, the tax chief responded: "Now even barefooted ones have a mobile phone."

Protests Underscore the Potential Power of Iran's Access to Information Law

This is an opportune time to fully enforce efforts towards transparency after Iran's December-January protests. The first step must be a full implementation of Iran’s Access to Information law.

Filipino Bloggers Rally to Defend Rappler News Site

"We stand against moves to silence and scare journalists, bloggers and media practitioners just because the President and his ardent supporters dislike their news and views."

The First Mobile Phone Network for Indigenous Communities in Mexico Is Under Threat

"This is the only telecommunications service that these communities have, historically they have not been covered...we believe a clear exemption for this type of operator should be in the law."

Leaked Documents Show That Ethiopia’s Ruling Elites Are Hiring Social Media Trolls (And Watching Porn)

The leaks include a list of individuals who appear to have been paid to promote the ruling coalition on social media.

Reuters Journalists Covering Rohingya Conflict in Myanmar Detained for ‘Illegally Acquiring Information’

"If Myanmar is serious about democratic reforms, it must accept the right of journalists to work freely and report on topics that make those in power uncomfortable."

Netizen Report: Five Months After Houthis Arrested Him, Human Rights Blogger Hisham Al-Omeisy Walks Free

The Advox Netizen Report offers an international snapshot of challenges, victories, and emerging trends in Internet rights around the world.

Philippine Authorities Order Shutdown of Rappler News Site, Bringing a Blow to Press Freedom

"If this revocation stands, Rappler will effectively be shut down —the first time a news organization will be closed by government since the dictator Marcos declared martial law in 1972."

How Will Macau's New Cybersecurity Legislation Impact Freedom of Speech?

The Macau Civil Servants Association (MCSA) called the proposal to monitor online data through binary code “arbitrary, disproportionate and illegal."

Why Wait? Wikipedia and Google Accidentally Declare Putin the Winner of March 2018 Presidential Elections

Whether the error was intended as a joke, or as a political move, is unknown.

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