Global Voices · December, 2014

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Latest posts by Global Voices from December, 2014

31 December 2014

Indians Plead for #NetNeutrality as Airtel Raises Data Charges

Although plans are now on hold due to regulatory restrictions, advocates worry that the company may yet find a way impose the fee increase.

29 December 2014

New Protest Facebook Page Already in Place as Kremlin Moves Navalny Verdict Forward

As thousands of Russians joined a January 15 protest against the verdict in the trial of opposition leader Navalny, the court suddenly moved the verdict announcement to tomorrow, December 30.

23 December 2014

Navalny Protest Rally Facebook Event Page Blocked in Russia

Just one day after supporters of Putin critic Alexey Navalny set up a Facebook event page for a protest rally in his support, the page has been blocked in Russia.

18 December 2014

The Russian Internet is Not Free. A New Tax Might Make it Even Worse.

The Russian government is now considering its own variant of an Internet tax, and wants to make all Russian Internet users pay for consuming copyrighted content online.

12 December 2014

Fear of ISIS Threatens Media Freedom in Kyrgyzstan

A Kyrgyz media outlet refused government requests to delete a reposted video of Kazakh children training in ISIS camps. Now it is partly blocked in both countries.

10 December 2014

What Does Japan’s State Secrecy Act Mean for Free Expression?

Japan’s controversial State Secrecy Act became law on Wednesday, December 10. The law imposes strict penalties on leakers of state secrets.

A New Filtering System Could Slow Down RuNet. And Then There's the Censorship

Internet filtering at ISP level might become reality in Russia by the end of 2014. This would slow down Internet speeds and introduce more surveillance and censorship in the RuNet.

4 December 2014

China's Censorship Authorities Are Not Fans of Foreign TV

Two popular subtitling sites closed their doors at the behest of Chinese authorities. Netizens and TV fans are angry about the decision.

1 December 2014

Selfies, ‘Sandwich Parties’ and ‘The Hunger Games': How Activists Have Challenged Thailand's Martial Law

Six months have passed since the army grabbed power and declared martial law in Thailand. During this time, Thai citizens have used various forms of protests against the junta.

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