Oiwan Lam

Am now a free lance researcher, translator and editor.

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Latest posts by Oiwan Lam

27 July 2016

Playing Pokémon Go in China Is Not Easy, but Many Are Still Risking It

Here are six things to keep in mind while playing Pokémon Go in China from our Northeast Asia editor Oiwan Lam.

21 July 2016

Chinese Reformist Magazine Shuts Down to Resist Authorities’ Hostile Takeover

"The crackdown on Yanhuang Chunqiu and today's takeover indicates that Xi's government wants to educate its officials into 'fools' like the rest of the society."

11 July 2016

A New Species of Beetle Named After President Xi Is Blacklisted on Chinese Social Media

"An act of ass kissing now turns into ass kicking…"

Chinese Censors Are Making Sure Social Media Only Shows Positive Flooding News

"The propaganda is good at turning a disaster into a positive story and making human errors invisible."

8 July 2016

China Bans News Sourcing From Social Media

"From a historical perspective, media outlets that are close to government have a higher tendency to fabricate news. The track record of state-controlled media outlets is even worse."

23 June 2016

Founder of Protest Reporting Outlet Goes Missing in China

Lu Yuyu has been missing since June 15. Yuyu has been reporting news of mass demonstrations in China via his platform "Not in the News" since 2013.

2 June 2016

China Mandates State-Private Management Model to Censor the Internet

The new regulations also forbids foreign investors for holding domestic live-streaming businesses.

16 May 2016

Chinese Censors Crack Down on ‘Illegal’ Live-Streaming, Including Erotic Banana Eating

As it is impossible to pre-screen live-streamed content, China's public security bureau has set up a police station at the office of major live-streaming platform to oversee what is broadcast.

18 April 2016

Dissidents Worry #TwitterisDead After Company Hires Former Chinese Military Officer

"This is a severe threat to the Chinese struggling for free speech."

5 April 2016

Wanna Reach the Chinese Internet Market? Time to Register Your Domain in China.

New rules will require leading foreign companies including Microsoft and Apple to register their sites' domain names with local DNS providers in order to remain accessible in China.

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