Oiwan Lam

Am now a free lance researcher, translator and editor.

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Latest posts by Oiwan Lam

24 April 2018

Why did China take its own propaganda film offline? Netizens point to US tech sanctions

Netizens suspect that the film is being restricted due to new US sanctions against ZTE, a Chinese telecommunications hardware company.

20 April 2018

Chinese netizens’ #IamLGBT campaign pushes change at Weibo

The move is significant, but it doesn’t mean that LGBT content will be spared from the latest censorship crackdown.

11 April 2018

No Laughing Matter: China Shuts Down Popular Joke-Sharing App

"A country, a government, a supervision department. They are all scared of a joke-sharing application."

3 April 2018

With ‘Sharp Eyes’, Smart Phones and TV Sets Are Watching Chinese Citizens

By 2020, China could have a comprehensive nationwide surveillance network, wherein law enforcement will have easy access to data collected by any individual surveillance camera in the network.

17 March 2018

How a Viral Eye Roll Broke the Silence on China's Heavily Censored Web

"The rolling eyes are like a bolt of lightening that destroys tens of thousands expressions of praise and outshines speeches made by hundreds of thousands of brain-dead people."

5 March 2018

Lantern Festival Riddles Outwit and Enrage Chinese Censorship Authorities

By posting riddles, Chinese netizens have found a way to safely criticize the recent constitutional amendment proposal regarding the abolition of the two-term presidential limit.

30 January 2018

#MeToo Has Hit China's Universities, Despite Efforts of Internet Censors

After months of censorship, a student's viral account of sexual misconduct by a renowned university professor has forced the discussion into the open.

10 January 2018

‘If I Don't Oppose Dictatorship, Am I Still a Man?': Chinese Activist Gets Eight Years in Prison

Wu Gan, better known by his nickname “Super Vulgar Butcher”, has been active in Chinese human rights circles since 2008.

27 December 2017

Don't Call “Xi the Bun” — Chinese Netizens Are Being Jailed for Chatroom Jokes

Three recent cases indicate that chatroom conversations in China are under surveillance and can be used as evidence in criminal prosecution.

12 October 2017

China's Sina Weibo Hires 1,000 Supervisors to Censor ‘Harmful Content'—Including Women's Legs

"Male users are less likely to be reported, while female users’ selfies, leg photos or waist photos that show off the success of their workouts are subjected to reduced scores."