Oiwan Lam

Am now a free lance researcher, translator and editor.

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Latest posts by Oiwan Lam

Twitter reveals China’s information operations on Hong Kong protests

The 936 accounts were merely the active ones and there existed a larger network of approximately 200,000 accounts created to undermine the legitimacy and political positions of the movement in...

Mainland Chinese netizens face ‘pink terror’ of patriotic trolls amid Hong Kong protests

Those who do not toe the official party line are identified and subjected to doxxing

China inspects Hongkongers’ mobiles for protest photos and chats at border checkpoints

In the face of border searches, Hong Kong protesters are picking up new technology tactics to mitigate their risk.

Pro-China forum's plan to troll Hong Kong protesters foiled after doxxing retaliation

Pro-China forum members quickly halted their plan to troll Hong Kong anti-extradition protesters after their personal information, including identity card number and bank record was exposed online.

Leica's promo video referencing Tiananmen Square massacre went viral on Chinese social media. Then, it disappeared.

For days, users were forbidden from writing the words "Leica" in English and "徕卡" in Chinese on Weibo.

Users flood Reddit with China censorship memes, balk at $150 million investment from Tencent

While Chinese companies regularly invest in US media companies, this makes for an unusual match.

Chinese authorities go after citizens for using VPNs, skirting online censorship

The news of two men being fined for using VPNs may serve as a wake up call to Chinese netizens.

What do Chinese internet users think of Google's ‘Dragonfly’ project?

Internet users remain divided over whether or not Google's supposed return to China is a good thing -- or not.

Crackdown in Beijing: ‘Using Twitter is more dangerous than street demonstrations’

The number of Twitter users who have been directly threatened by authorities is estimated to be in the hundreds or even more.

Political cartoonist Badiucao abruptly cancelled his Hong Kong exhibition — and then went silent

The event was seen by many as a test of the limits of free speech in Hong Kong.

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