Onnik Krikorian · March, 2011

Onnik Krikorian is a journalist and photojournalist of English and Armenia descent who has been resident in the Republic of Armenia since 1998. He also works extensively in Georgia and until moving to Yerevan worked on the Kurds in Turkey and the conflict in Nagorno Karabakh.

His articles and photographs have been published by The Los Angeles Times, New Internationalist, The Scotsman, Transitions Online, Middle East Insight, Oneworld.net, EurasiaNet, The Institute for War & Peace Reporting, New York University Press, UNICEF, and Amnesty International, among others. Krikorian has also worked as a fixer for Al Jazeera English, the BBC and The Wall Street Journal.

He maintains a blog from Armenia and the South Caucasus at http://blog.oneworld.am and also posts for the London-based Frontline Club at http://frontlineclub.com/blogs/onnikkrikorian.

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Latest posts by Onnik Krikorian from March, 2011

Azerbaijan: Anonymous says Big Brother might be watching you

Since activists in Azerbaijan started using Facebook to coordinate and widen their activities, the authorities in the former Soviet republic are starting to keep a closer eye on social networking...

Azerbaijan: Blowing Up in Their Facebook

Baku seems to be getting savvier about how to discredit, marginalize, or monitor online activists. This article was originally published on 9 March 2011 by Transitions Online and is used...

Azerbaijan: Another activist arrested, questioned over Facebook

Following concerns that there might be an official attempt to discredit or crackdown on the use of Facebook by alternative voices in Azerbaijan comes news of the detention of yet...

Azerbaijan: As protests loom, Facebook is monitored

Recent events in the Middle East and North Africa have highlighted the potential use of online social networks for activism, but they have also added weight to existing personal and...

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