· May, 2015

Stories about Censorship from May, 2015

Amid “Intelligent” Censorship Discussions, Iran Affirms Facebook Will Remain Blocked

Discussions regarding the implementation of “intelligent” filtering have proliferated Internet policy within Iran. “Intelligent” filtering is a process whereby they filter select content on a social media platform, rather than...

Facebook's Zuckerberg Responds to Ukrainians’ Complaints, But Is His Answer Enough?

Mark Zuckerberg has addressed the appeals of Ukrainian Facebook users for better content moderation and calls to create a dedicated Ukrainian office. His answers seem unlikely to satisfy them.

Bahrain Court Upholds Six Month Sentence Against Rights Defender Nabeel Rajab Over Tweet

A Bahrain court today upheld a six-month sentence for human rights defender Nabeel Rajab over a tweet. Rajab is already in custody under investigation for other tweets.

Suspended Algerian Satirical TV Show Vows to Make a Comeback Online

''Eldjazairia weekend'' an Algerian satirical TV show, co-hosted by GV contributor Abdou Semmar, was suspended from air on April 24, due to political pressure.

Selective Truths Revealed: The Case of Iranian Search Engines

Iranian authorities maintain that local search engines can compete with Google and other Western alternatives. A new study by Iran research group Small Media puts these claims to the test.

New Research: Iran is Using ‘Intelligent’ Censorship on Instagram

Political pages are accessible, but Justin Bieber and the Kardashians are blocked. Saddled with a censorship regime that is both exhaustive and ineffective, Iranian authorities are experimenting with “intelligent” filtering.

Iran's Leading Women's Magazine Suspended After Covering Cohabitation Outside of Marriage

Managing editor Shahla Sherkat says she's hopeful she can convince the court to allow publication to resume. Iran’s Press Oversight Committee suspended Zanan-e Emrooz, reportedly for writing about "white marriages."

Despite Low Internet Use, Burundi Blocks Viber and WhatsApp

Fewer than 2 percent of Burundi’s 10.2 million residents use the Internet. Nevertheless, the government blocked Viber and WhatsApp this week, amid protests.

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