Stories about Myanmar (Burma)

Billions served? Human rights in the Facebook era

Tracking hate speech, harassment, and political censorship on the world’s largest social network

Netizen Report: Around the World, Activists Demand Answers From Facebook

The Advox Netizen Report offers an international snapshot of challenges, victories, and emerging trends in Internet rights around the world.

#SayNOto66d: Documenting the Surge of Online Defamation Cases in Myanmar

The #SayNOto66d website documents online defamation cases in Myanmar while providing information tools to support the campaign to repeal the law.

Reuters Journalists Covering Rohingya Conflict in Myanmar Detained for ‘Illegally Acquiring Information’

"If Myanmar is serious about democratic reforms, it must accept the right of journalists to work freely and report on topics that make those in power uncomfortable."

Netizen Report: Online Supporters of Myanmar's Rohingya Face Censorship, Legal Threats

Salvadoran journalists face violent threats on social media, Japanese activists stomp on hateful tweets and Chile doubles down on data retention.

Violence in Northwest Myanmar Sparks an Information War Online with Anti-Rohingya Hate Speech and Fake Photos

Malicious propaganda, hate speech, and false photos are making it difficult to verify information coming from the conflict in northwest Myanmar.

Jailed for Journalism: A Profile of Detained Reporters in Myanmar

Since June 2017, five members of the media have been detained by the government.

Myanmar’s Challenging Media Landscape, in Cartoons

Cartoons published by The Irrawaddy over the course of four years— from 2014 to 2017—reflecting the media milestones and hardships experienced in Myanmar.

Netizen Report: Working in the Public Interest Can Get You Arrested

Global Voices Advocacy's Netizen Report offers an international snapshot of challenges, victories, and emerging trends in Internet rights around the world.

Myanmar Military Cracks Down on Independent Media, Arrests Three Journalists

"It is absurd that security forces are using outdated laws to silence and punish journalists who have committed no crime," wrote the editor of The Irrawaddy.

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