· June, 2015

Stories about Russia from June, 2015

No More Internet: Website Models Effect Of ‘Right to Be Forgotten’ on Russian Search Engines

A new website created by Russian advertising executives asks Russian users to imagine what search engines will look like in 2018—if the “right to be forgotten” bill becomes law.

Self-Proclaimed ‘Donetsk People's Republic’ Now Has an Internet Blacklist

A new law in the rebel eastern Ukraine state instituting a blacklist for webpages with content "prohibited in the republic" seems to be targeting Ukrainian media websites.

Russian Lawmakers Vote to Support First Draft of ‘Right to Be Forgotten’ Law

Only one Russian lawmaker voted against the new draft law, with other members of parliament overwhelmingly supporting the "right to be forgotten" regulations for search engines.

Russia Moves Forward on ‘Right to be Forgotten’ Bill Despite Industry Protests

Lawmakers insist on adopting the new legislation that would require search engines in Russia to delete links to information and content online based on user requests.

Facebook Responds to ‘Stop Political Blocking’ Petition by Russians and Ukrainians

In a statement posted to Change.org on June 8, Thomas Kristensen, Facebook’s director of policy for Eastern Europe and Russia, explained that the social network stands by its moderation policies

Netizen Report: In Quest to Tame Internet, Kremlin Targets Privacy Tools

  Ellery Roberts Biddle, Mohamed ElGohary, Weiping Li, Hae-in Lim, Tetyana Lokot, Kevin Rothrock and Sarah Myers West contributed to this report. Global Voices Advocacy's Netizen Report offers an international...

Tor Use in Russia Spiking in Response to Kremlin's Censorship Efforts

As the Kremlin steps up its efforts to enforce Internet censorship, search engine data shows a growing number of Russians use Tor to circumvent content blocking.

How Safe Are Internet Search Engines from Russian Censorship?

Saddling Internet search engines in Russia with new regulations raises special concerns, given Moscow's recent track record for reinterpreting Internet laws in ways that inhibit civic freedoms online.

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