Stories about Free Expression

15 September 2016

Ghanaian President Vows Not to Shut Down Social Media During Elections

Ghanaian president John Mahama has assured the nation that social media will not be shut down during elections due to take place on December 7.

8 September 2016

Algerian Court Upholds Conviction of Activist Jailed for Insulting Islam on Facebook

Despite having his sentenced decreased by two years, Bouhafs will still remain in jail for expressing his views.

6 September 2016

Russia's Pokemon Gulag

Ruslan Sokolovksy’s alleged crime was filming himself playing Pokemon Go inside a Russian Orthodox cathedral. If convicted of the charges, he could go to prison for up to five years.

Cuban Journalist and LGBT Activist Sacked for Working With Non-State Media

"It doesn’t matter where you publish, even if it’s just on your blog. We will always be reading what you write."

2 September 2016

After Two Months on Hunger Strike, Jailed Algerian Journalist Enters Coma

Mohamad Tamalt went on hunger strike on 27 June to protest his arrest and imprisonment. He is in jail for insulting the Algerian President online.

‘Spy’ Trial Against Macedonian Journalist Is Postponed Amid Calls for His Release

"Such cases are intended to punish the disobedient journalists and intimidate and discipline the others."

29 August 2016

Death Penalty Still Looms for Mauritanian Blogger Who Spoke Out Against Caste-Based Discrimination

"This sentence signifies a step backwards in terms of tolerance and shows just how much issues of cast, religion, slavery and therefore democracy are taboos in Mauritania."

28 August 2016

Lawsuit Over Facebook Post Raises Fears of Online Censorship in Bhutan

The suit against Zam revolves a family that is fighting a property dispute against well-connected business man Ap Sonam Phuntsho, who is also father-in-law to the Chief Justice of Bhutan.

5 August 2016

Justice as Usual, or Attack on Free Speech? Debunking Singapore’s Contempt-of-Court Bill

"Leaving people confused over what can or can’t be said will have a chilling effect, whatever the intention of the law, further entrenching a culture of self-censorship and passive citizenship."

4 August 2016

Anonymous Eritrea: Communicating in a Paranoid State

Many believe that the state can monitor any Eritrean, in any corner of the world. The regime has successfully portrayed itself as omnipresent—this is fundamental to its survival.

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