Stories about Mexico

Netizen Report: Amid WhatsApp attacks, advocates launch legal challenge against Israeli malware maker

Spyware makers exploit a security flaw in WhatsApp, Singapore bans false information and Somalia plans to shut down social media during school exams.

What's happened to digital rights over the past seven years? 300 editions of the Netizen Report will tell you

This week, we're looking back at seven years of covering global digital rights news in celebration of our 300th edition!

Mexico's new copyright law allows censorship of online content, rights advocates warn

The Mexican chapter of the Wikimedia Foundation warned that the approved changes "criminalize the act of publishing" and "legalize acts of violating the fundamental and constitutional rights..."

In Mexico, an indigenous community telco will continue to operate — for now

"For us, the fact that we had to pay a million pesos meant that we would stop operating."

Mexico's Electoral Authority Announces Collaboration with Facebook, Casting Doubt on its Credibility

Social media are accusing the INE of creating "fake news" for having made false claims about an agreement with Facebook.

Netizen Report: Mexican NGOs Push for Independent Investigation of Malware Attacks

The Advox Netizen Report offers an international snapshot of challenges, victories, and emerging trends in Internet rights around the world.

The First Mobile Phone Network for Indigenous Communities in Mexico Is Under Threat

"This is the only telecommunications service that these communities have, historically they have not been covered...we believe a clear exemption for this type of operator should be in the law."

Evidence of Government Surveillance in Mexico Continues to Mount

Intrusive technologies used to intimidate and silence dissent continue to be used in Mexico.

Murdered Mexican Journalist Cándido Ríos: ‘Our Weapons Do Not Shoot Bullets. Our Weapons Shoot Truth’

"His tireless efforts to denounce injustice brought him popularity among readers, but also enemies like the former mayor of Ríos' hometown Hueyapan, who threatened him with death several times."

Can Facebook Connect the Next Billion?

New research by Global Voices tech and digital rights experts in Colombia, Ghana, Kenya, Mexico, Pakistan and the Philippines exposes the ups and downs of Facebook's "Free Basics" app.

Mexico's Drug War Makes Everyone a Target

The rise in use of digital surveillance tools has become part and parcel of Mexico's ongoing internal armed conflict.

How the Mexican Government Puts Citizens Under Systematic Surveillance

Evidence shows that espionage tools have been used for years against Mexican activists, journalists and people who hold dissenting opinions or oppose the current government in some form.

‘No to Silence': Javier Valdez's Murder Highlights Persistent Perils for Mexican Journalists

Seven journalists have been murdered in Mexico this year. Since 2012, less than one percent of attacks on journalists have resulted in a criminal conviction.

Netizen Report: Mexican Journalists Were Threatened Online, Then Killed

Kashmiris see more cuts to basic communications services, a Japanese artist gets fined for her 3D vagina art, and Thailand tells Facebookers to "unfollow" state critics.

Netizen Report: In Kenya and Mexico, Citizens Suspect State Manipulation on Twitter

As social manipulation abounds on Twitter, Venezuela blocks more news websites, and Facebook heads to France to fight fake news.

Battle of the Hashtags: Mapping the Online Conversation Surrounding Mexico's Gas Prices

In the wake of protests following Mexico's hike in gas prices, social media has become a battlefield over the propagation of false stories.

Mexico's Attorney General Secretly Purchased Costly Spyware (Again)

The Mexican government, for many years, allocated millions of dollars to acquiring highly intrusive digital spy technology without being transparent on how they were using it.

Technical Difficulties and Allegations of Corruption Leave Mexicans Concerned About New Transparency Agency

A malfunctioning platform a poorly received anti-sexting campaign and serious allegations of corruption tarnish the reputation of the office of transparency and privacy in Mexico.

So Long, Phone Companies. Mexico’s Indigenous Groups Are Getting Their Own Telecoms.

For the first time in history, the Mixe, Mixteco, and Zapoteco populations will get licenses to operate a telecommunications network for indigenous communities to access cellular and Internet services.

In Defense of Free Software: My Case Against Lenovo in Mexico

Lenovo fails to inform its clients of the Secure Boot feature on the Lenovo Yoga 2, which restricts the right to install operating systems besides those authorized by Microsoft.

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