· August, 2016

Stories about Human Rights from August, 2016

30 August 2016

Journalist Jean Bigirimana is Still Missing as Burundi's Political Crisis Continues

The government's denial of Jean's detention has left his friends and colleagues fearful that authorities may be concealing information on his whereabouts or death.

29 August 2016

Death Penalty Still Looms for Mauritanian Blogger Who Spoke Out Against Caste-Based Discrimination

"This sentence signifies a step backwards in terms of tolerance and shows just how much issues of cast, religion, slavery and therefore democracy are taboos in Mauritania."

28 August 2016

Lawsuit Over Facebook Post Raises Fears of Online Censorship in Bhutan

The suit against Zam revolves a family that is fighting a property dispute against well-connected business man Ap Sonam Phuntsho, who is also father-in-law to the Chief Justice of Bhutan.

25 August 2016

Netizen Report: Bangladesh and Ethiopia Flip the Switch on Internet as Political Tensions Rise

Web blocking continues to plague Bangladesh and Ethiopia, Peru drops US $22 million on spyware, and sharing just might become a crime in Colombia.

WikiLeaks: From Collateral Murder to Collateral Recklessness

From rape victims to democratic party donors, WikiLeaks' latest data dumps demonstrate a disturbing trend of publishing the personal information of private individuals.

22 August 2016

In India, a Nationalistic ‘Witch Hunt’ Targets Journalists Who Exposed #BabyLift Trafficking Operation

According to its constitution, India is a secular republic with freedom of expression, but it also prohibits anything that hurts religious or ethnic sensitivities.

9 August 2016

Technical Difficulties and Allegations of Corruption Leave Mexicans Concerned About New Transparency Agency

A malfunctioning platform a poorly received anti-sexting campaign and serious allegations of corruption tarnish the reputation of the office of transparency and privacy in Mexico.

4 August 2016

Anonymous Eritrea: Communicating in a Paranoid State

Many believe that the state can monitor any Eritrean, in any corner of the world. The regime has successfully portrayed itself as omnipresent—this is fundamental to its survival.