· May, 2016

Stories about Law from May, 2016

27 May 2016

Netizen Report: Chilean Copyright Bill Could Eliminate Public Domain for Video, Music

Journalist Khadija Ismayilova wins court challenge in Azerbaijan, Vietnam censors Facebook and Instagram in the face of protests and the Nigerian Senate throws out ‘anti-social media bill’

23 May 2016

Ghanaian Minister Vows Not to Ban Whatsapp, Skype and Viber Calls

"Methinks the telcos need to smell the coffee because the traditional 'voice game' is over, and with it, the monopoly profits they used to make."

Venezuela: Research Confirms Censorship of News Platforms, Currency Websites

The study also confirmed that all local Internet service providers using DNS (domain name system) blocking, technique through which domain name servers respond incorrectly to requests for a particular domain.

19 May 2016

Netizen Report: Two of Egypt’s Leading Human Rights Defenders Face Legal Challenge

Social media is back on in Uganda, but off in Iraq; a new tool helps Russians make friends (and target victims); and @Verdade reveals that Mozambique is conducting mass surveillance.

Mexico Launches National Transparency Platform

Mexico has a new tool to combat the opacity of public servants and of those who govern. But its effectiveness in practice remains to be seen.

13 May 2016

Bulgarian ‘Green’ Activist Faces Lawsuit Over Facebook Post

Bulgarian eco-activist Borislav Sandov was sentenced for "insulting" the director of a mining company through a Facebook status. Court of appeals will hear his case at the end of May.

11 May 2016

Draft Law Would Prohibit Showing ‘Disputed Areas’ on Maps of India

A new bill in India has been proposed to ban anyone to call the Pakistan and China borders as "disputed areas" along with several other restrictions.

10 May 2016

#LeyTelecom: Mexican Supreme Court Ratifies Geolocation and Retention of Metadata

Mexico's Supreme Court has ratified the indiscriminate retention of metadata, allowing authorities to use real-time geolocation of mobile devices. But the battle in defense of privacy is far from over.